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Celebrating the impact of research published through the Swedish Transformative Agreement in 2023

 

The articles featured in this celebratory collection have been selected for the great impact they have achieved in such a short period of time.

From achieving high downloads and citations to receiving significant media coverage, these papers show how our TA in Sweden is increasing the visibility and impact of scientific research.

Join your fellow researchers who are shaping the future of science, and your articles could also be featured in news outlets such as National Geographic,
BBC News and ScienceDaily.

Find out if your institution is participating in this agreement to make sure your next paper gets the greatest exposure.

 

 

Read the Swedish articles making an impact across our journal portfolio


Roadmap  |  Open Access
Roadmap for optical tweezers
Giovanni Volpe, Göteborgs Universitet et al
2023 J. Phys. Photonics 5 022501 https://doi.org/10.1088/2515-7647/acb57b


Paper  |  Open Access
ChatGPT and the frustrated Socrates
Bor Gregorcic, Uppsala Universitet and Ann-Marie Pendrill, Lunds Universitet
2023 Phys. Educ. 58 035021 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/acc299


Letter  |  Open Access
Phasing out coal for 2 °C target requires worldwide replication of most ambitious national plans despite security and fairness concerns
Vadim Vinichenko, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola et al
2023 Environ. Res. Lett. 18 014031 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/acadf6


Paper  |  Open Access
Enhancement of PIV measurements via physics-informed neural networks
Ricardo Vinuesa, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan et al
2023 Meas. Sci. Technol. 34 044002 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6501/aca9eb


Paper  |  Open Access
The gyroscopic effect and moment of inertia
Åke Fäldt, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola and Tobias Fredlund, Högskolan i Gävle
2023 Phys. Educ. 58 025001 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/aca73a


Paper  |  Open Access
Strong perpendicular anisotropic ferromagnet Fe3GeTe2/graphene van der Waals heterostructure
Bing Zhao, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola et al
2023 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 56 094001 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6463/acb801


Letter  |  Open Access
Canopy responses of Swedish primary and secondary forests to the 2018 drought
Julika Wolf, Lunds Universitet et al
2023 Environ. Res. Lett. 18 064044 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/acd6a8


Letter  |  Open Access
Historical diffusion of nuclear, wind and solar power in different national contexts: implications for climate mitigation pathways
Vadim Vinichenko, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola et al
2023 Environ. Res. Lett. 18 094066 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/acf47a


Paper  |  Open Access
Accelerating a car from rest: friction, power and forces
Andreas Isacsson, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola et al
2023 Phys. Educ. 58 055005 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ace1c7


Letter  |  Open Access
Persistent anomalies of the North Atlantic jet stream and associated surface extremes over Europe
Vera Melinda Galfi and Gabriele Messori, Uppsala Universitet
2023 Environ. Res. Lett. 18 024017 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/acaedf


Paper  |  Open Access
Ageing of High Energy Density Automotive Li-Ion Batteries: The Effect of Temperature and State-of-Charge
Anastasiia Mikheenkova, Uppsala Universitet et al
2023 J. Electrochem. Soc. 170 080503 https://doi.org/10.1149/1945-7111/aceb8f


Roadmap  |  Open Access
2023 Roadmap on molecular modelling of electrochemical energy materials
Chao Zhang, Uppsala Universitet et al
2023 J. Phys. Energy 5 041501 https://doi.org/10.1088/2515-7655/acfe9b


Letter  |  Open Access
Substantial carbon sequestration by peatlands in temperate areas revealed by InSAR
Behshid Khodaei, Lunds Universitet et al
2023 Environ. Res. Lett. 18 044012 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/acc194


Paper  |  Open Access
Competing Ethylene Carbonate Reactions on Carbon Electrode in Li-Ion Batteries
Robin Lundström, Uppsala Universitet et al
2023 J. Electrochem. Soc. 170 040516 https://doi.org/10.1149/1945-7111/accb6e


Paper  |  Open Access
Participatory pathways to the Sustainable Development Goals: inviting divergent perspectives through a cross-scale systems approach
David Collste, Stockholms Universitet et al
2023 Environ. Res. Commun. 5 055014 https://doi.org/10.1088/2515-7620/acce25


Paper  |  Open Access
Synchrotron XPS and Electrochemical Study of Aging Effect on Passive Film of Ni Alloys
Josefin Eidhagen, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan et al
2023 J. Electrochem. Soc. 170 021506 https://doi.org/10.1149/1945-7111/acba4b


Paper  |  Open Access
Modular 3D printed platform for fluidically connected human brain organoid culture
Jessica Giacomon and Janko Kajtez, Lunds Universitet et al
2024 Biofabrication 16 015014 https://doi.org/10.1088/1758-5090/ad0c2c


Paper  |  Open Access
MXene/poly(ionic liquid) porous composite membranes for systematized solar-driven interfacial steam generation
Atefeh Khorsand Kheirabad, Stockholms Universitet et al
2023 2D Mater. 10 024008 https://doi.org/10.1088/2053-1583/acc415


Paper  |  Open Access
PTsymmetry-protected exceptional cones and analogue Hawking radiation
Marcus Stålhammar, Stockholms Universitet et al
2023 New J. Phys. 25 043012 https://doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/acc6e5


Paper  |  Open Access
High power impulse magnetron sputtering of tungsten: a comparison of experimental and modelling results
Jon Tomas Gudmundsson, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan et al
2023 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 32 034003 https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6595/acc12f


Researchers from Lebanon

IOP Publishing (IOP) has a transformative agreement with American University of Beirut to enable a transition to open access publishing.

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students American University of Beirut, at the point of submission, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Articles accepted will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves
  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D. Click here for a full title list of eligible journals.

Please note
A small number of journals attract additional charges including but not limited to, page charges. These remain payable by the authors.

You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub

Researchers from Macau

IOP Publishing (IOP) has a transformative agreement with the University of Macau to enable a transition to open access publishing.

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students at University of Macau, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Articles accepted will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves
  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D in the title list of eligible journals

Please note
A small number of journals attract additional charges including but not limited to, page charges. These remain payable by the authors.
You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub.
For more information, please contact your relevant library contact at your university.

Researchers from Saudi Arabia

IOP Publishing (IOP) has a transformative agreement with two institutions in Saudi Arabia in the to enable a transition to open access publishing.

“As pioneers in open access publishing, KAUST Library have signed a number of transformative agreements and continues to excel in this field. With the new unlimited IOPP 3-year deal, we’ve reached a new milestone on our open access publishing journey which provides wider recognition and greater impact of KAUST research.”
Nora Alshibani, KAUST Library Director

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students at one of the institutions below, at the point of submission, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Articles accepted will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves
  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D. Click here for a full title list of eligible journals.

Please note
A small number of journals attract additional charges including but not limited to, page charges. These remain payable by the authors. You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub. For more information, please contact your relevant library contact at your university.

Eligible institutions
King Abdulaziz University
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)

Researchers from Taiwan

IOP Publishing (IOP) has a transformative agreement with Physics Research Promotion Center to enable a transition to open access publishing.

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students at one of the institutions below, at the point of submission, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Articles accepted will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves
  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D. Click here for a full title list of eligible journals.

Please note
A small number of journals attract additional charges including but not limited to, page charges. These remain payable by the authors.

You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub.

For more information, please contact your relevant library contact at your university, or stma@mx.nthu.edu.tw. You can also visit the Physics Research Promotion Center.

 Eligible institutions
Academia Sinica
Chung Yuan Christian University
National Central University
National Changhua University of Education
National Cheng Kung University
National Chengchi University
National Chung Cheng University
National Chung Hsing University
National Dong Hwa University
National Sun Yat-sen University
National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center
National Taiwan Normal University
National Taiwan Ocean University
National Taiwan University
National Taiwan University of Science & Technology
National Tsing Hua University
National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University
Soochow University
Tamkang University
Tunghai University

Researchers from Japan

IOP Publishing (IOP) has a transformative agreement with Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories to enable a transition to open access publishing.

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students at Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories at the point of submission, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D. Click here for a full title list of eligible journals.
  • 6 articles per year, accepted from 1st January, will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves.

Please note
Funding is subject to librarian funding approval at acceptance stage. If for any reason funding is declined, the author(s) will have the opportunity to revert to subscription publication type at zero cost to themselves or the member institution.

A very limited number of journals carry additional charges. Please access the journal home pages here and check the publication charges tab for further information.

You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub. For more information, please contact your relevant library contact at your university.

Dr Chris Marsh, University of Saskatchewan, Canada


Dr Chris Marsh

Along with two other researchers, Christopher Marsh validated the cutting-edge global-extent “forest and buildings removed Copernicus digital elevation model” (FABDEM) for accuracy. Their research provides confidence in space-based topography mapping, especially in canopy filled mountain terrain. Read Christopher Marsh’s article in Environmental Research Communications: Validation of FABDEM, a global bare-earth elevation model, against UAV-lidar derived elevation in a complex forested mountain catchment


Congratulations on your latest paper. Can you please briefly explain the research that was published?

In the Earth Sciences, satellite imagery is used extensively to map and study terrain. A persistent problem in space-based observation and topography models is that tree canopies and urban canopies lead to overestimation of elevation. Last year, researchers released a global-coverage digital elevation dataset called FABDEM that uses machine learning to remove the artifacts of vegetation and buildings from mapped terrain. This dataset thus offers maps of the bare earth, denuded of canopies and with improved precision.

Our work is an independent evaluation of the accuracy of the FABDEM dataset. We compared the global FABDEM dataset to elevation measured using a LIDAR sensor mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). LIDAR is short for Light Detection and Ranging. It is a method used to image the surface of the earth remotely. UAV-LIDAR provides the highest resolution and accuracy possible for elevation mapping beneath forest canopies and represents the best estimate of the “true” elevation. We evaluated the dataset in one of the trickiest locations—steep, forested mountain terrain. We found that the FABDEM global-coverage dataset was comparable to the UAV-LIDAR dataset and was best-in-class when compared to other existing and commonly used vegetation-removed datasets.

Do you have any personal motivation for studying this topic?

As hydrological modelers and field researchers, we depend heavily on good digital representations of the topography across basins and regions. As mentioned previously, removing vegetation and urban canopies is crucial to improving the accuracy of space-based elevation measurements. FABDEM is the latest database of elevation data. But it needs to be tested and validated. Being able to validate next-generation datasets with our own highly detailed LIDAR observations gives us confidence in these datasets. This is what motivated this study.

What do you imagine are the potential real-life applications of your research, or how will it affect people’s lives in the long term?

The FABDEM dataset is considered one of the best global-coverage datasets. However, because it includes the biases of forest canopies, it is considered less useful for certain types of hydrological modeling and ecological studies, especially in rugged mountain topography. Thus, the machine-learning dataset can potentially be used if it is proven to be accurate in such locations. Also, the steep, forested mountain areas are typically poorly represented in many datasets. So, having an independent evaluation in this location can give other researchers further confidence in using the FABDEM dataset.

Can you describe the process of publishing through a transformative agreement with IOPP?

It was very effortless and automatic. Our institution was clearly listed as having signed the transformative agreement with IOPP. Therefore, it all worked out seamlessly throughout the submission, review, and publication process.

What do you think are the advantages of publishing through a transformative agreement?

Publishing open access is critical for maximizing research impact and ensuring widespread dissemination of research findings. Being able to do so at no cost is important for us researchers, and it removes any hesitation to publish open access. Normally, publishing open access incurs a significant cost—so consideration is limited to if/when funds are available and specific papers. The transformative agreement gives researchers the financial freedom to share more of their valuable work with the world.

What is your advice for other authors looking to publish open access through transformative agreements?

It was not an agreement we were previously aware of; therefore, I would encourage other authors to check if their institution is a partner proactively!

Example Figures

To make your figures accessible to as many readers as possible, try to avoid conveying information using only colour differences. In graphs and plots use symbols, labels, line styles or fill patterns to indicate different data, in addition to different colours.

Demonstration of using labels or line styles so that information is clear when figures are converted to greyscale. Left panels show lines in different colours which are very similar when converted to greyscale (right panels). The lines are easy to distinguish by using either labels (top panels) or line styles (bottom panels).

Figure 1. Demonstration of using labels or line styles so that information is clear when figures are converted to greyscale. Left panels show lines in different colours which are very similar when converted to greyscale (right panels). The lines are easy to distinguish by using either labels (top panels) or line styles (bottom panels). The same principle can be applied to other types of chart.

It is not always possible to have good colour contrast or to use labels or symbols, for example with photographic images or colour gradient maps.

For all figures it is important to use the figure caption to provide a description of the information that the figure conveys so that all readers, including those using screen-reader technology, can understand why the image is present. Figure captions must be understandable without needing to refer to the main text of the article.

Figures 2-5 are examples taken from published articles to demonstrate use of the figure caption to describe the information that the image conveys.

 

Figure 2. FMR response curves of PMA–SAF as a function of the phase factor θ of microwave fields. Here H0 = 2 kOe, h0 = 30 Oe and θ varies from 0° to 180°. The resonance signal amplitude of the LH mode increases while that of RH mode decreases with θ increasing. [Example figure taken from Chen X et al 2021 New J. Phys. 23 113029 https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/ac3556]

 

Figure 3. Plot of 𝒫0θ) (equation (3)) from Δθ ∈ [−.5, .5) for various dc . Note that 𝒫0 has infinite domain with period 1. Probability of the (dc -level) control register of an IPEA collapsing to |0⟩ as a function of difference between the eigenphase θ and the applied rotation θR , ΔθθθR for an eigenstate input. Note that when the applied rotation matches the eigenphase (Δθ = 0), the control collapses to |0⟩ deterministically. Denote the region around Δθ = 0 (from dot to dot) as the central lobe of 𝒫0θ), and the small lobes with local maxima outside of it as the sidelobes. See that the higher the system’s dimensionality, the narrower the probability curve’s central lobe and the lower local maxima in the sidelobes. Note that dc = 2 has no sidelobes (the probability is monotonic on either side of the central lobe). Also note 𝒫0θ) = 0 for Δθ = dc-1 and the width of the central lobe is therefore ΔθFWHM = 2 dc-1. [Example figure taken from Moore A J et al 2021 New J. Phys. 23 113027 https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/ac320d]

Three Hall sensors are positioned on the inner core, and two sensors are on the ring.

Figure 4. Sample assembly arrangement. Three Hall sensors are positioned on the inner core, and two sensors are on the ring. The distance between adjacent sensors is 2.5 mm. A further sensor is placed inside the bore of the ring. [Example figure taken from Zhou D et al 2020 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 33 034001 https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6668/ab66e7]

Local XMCD pattern inside the YBCO(250 nm)/Py(50 nm) bilayer at T = 26 K after zero field cooling. The positions of the flux fronts/d-lines are marked by black lines.

Figure 5. Local XMCD pattern inside the YBCO(250 nm)/Py(50 nm) bilayer at T = 26 K after zero field cooling. The positions of the flux fronts/d-lines are marked by black lines. (Left) Increasing the external magnetic field from −40 to −20 mT (ΔB = +20 mT) leads to supercurrents flowing clockwise inside the sample. Here, the local magnetic field points towards the center of the square enhancing the penetration of magnetic flux (black lines). (Right) In case of ΔB = −20 mT (+40 to +20 mT) supercurrents flow anti-clockwise, reversing the latter effect. [Example figure taken from Simmendinger J et al 2020 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 33 025015 https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6668/ab54ab]

Dr. Peter J. Riggs, Australian National University, Australia


Dr. Peter J. Riggs from the Australian National University, a physicist and philosopher of science, is exploring ways to better teach and communicate basic concepts in physics, both to improve our understanding of physics, and to prevent misconceptions from being perpetuated. His article, Energy and Mass Misconceptions was published open access in Physics Education, under the transformative agreement with the Council of Australian University Librarians.

Congratulations on your latest paper. Why is the theme of your article, people’s understanding of energy and mass, important? 

Much of my research examines the foundations of physics. The nature of energy and mass are essential concepts in this field of science. Energy, for instance, is fundamental to all physical processes but still needs to be better understood. 

Reading your article gives the impression that you are worried about the current state of physics education. Do you have any personal motivation for studying this topic? 

In parallel to my research endeavours, I have a strong desire to communicate basic physics concepts clearly and intelligibly.  This arises, in part, because as a student, I found that the teaching of such concepts was not always accurately done, and there was insufficient attention to student understanding.  

What are some specific real-life applications of your research and how will they affect people’s lives in the long term? 

A better understanding of the nature of energy will likely assist in finding new ways to develop and utilise non-polluting / environmentally friendly sources of energy. Such energy sources will be crucial in the fight against global warming. 

You published this article through a transformative agreement (TA) with IOP Publishing. How was the experience? 

IOP Publishing has made publishing through the TA with the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) an easy process. Publishing open access now takes no more effort than what was required before the CAUL agreement came into effect. 

What do you think are the benefits of publishing through a TA? 

There are some major advantages, especially the degree to which one’s articles may now be read by physicists, physics teachers and anyone who is interested, at no cost to themselves or their institutions. 

What is your advice for authors who want to publish open access through TAs? 

In light of the advantages of publishing open access, I would encourage other researchers and physics education professionals to seek out relevant journals with transformative agreements. 

 

Researchers from Australia

IOP Publishing (IOP) has transformative agreements with a number of institutions in Australia to enable a transition to open access publishing.

Who can benefit?
All corresponding authors that are current staff members, researchers (permanent, temporary and visiting), or students at one of the institutions below at the point of submission, can publish open access at no cost to themselves. The corresponding author is the author that submits the manuscript and is responsible for communicating with the journal during the submission, peer review and publication process.

What’s included?

  • Accepted articles will be eligible for transformative agreement funding to enable authors to publish open access with no cost to themselves
  • Research paper, special issue, letter and review article types
  • Included journals are those in lists A, B, C and D. Click here for a full title list of eligible journals.

Please note
A very limited number of journals carry additional charges. Please access the journal home pages here and check the publication charges tab for further information.
You may find our author guide for submitting under a transformative agreement helpful located in our Transformative Agreement hub.
For more information, please contact your relevant library contact at your university.

Eligible institutions

Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL):

  • Australian National University
  • Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
  • Curtin University
  • Deakin University
  • Flinders University
  • Griffith University
  • La Trobe University
  • Macquarie University
  • Monash University
  • Murdoch University
  • Queensland University of Technology
  • Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
  • Swinburne Technology University
  • University of Adelaide
  • University of Melbourne
  • University of New South Wales
  • University of Newcastle
  • University of Queensland
  • University of South Australia
  • University of Southern Queensland
  • University of Sydney
  • University of Tasmania
  • University of Technology Sydney
  • University of Western Australia
  • University of Wollongong
  • Western Sydney University